Cramer’s lightning round: I’m not a fan of Netflix’s stock as an end-of-year buy

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Netflix Inc.: “Candidly, I’m not a fan of Netflix. I’m not a fan of Netflix because I think that a lot of it depends on the content and I just don’t find the content as compelling as it once was. I think it’s a good story, but not a great story, because it’s up so much for the year and that’s been a real big determinant about how stocks are doing right now.”

Cytokinetics Inc.: “Very speculative, but I’ll endorse it as long as you understand that that thing is literally one of the most speculative stocks out there.”

Yeti Holdings Inc.: “Yeah, I think [its post-earnings dip is a buying opportunity]. I actually liked the quarter. I mean, far be it from me to disagree with the market’s view, but I liked the quarter. I think it’s OK. The market liked the PepsiCos and the Gileads this week, and the Celgenes.”

The Kraft Heinz Co.: “[What’s not to love?] Well, the fact that it has no growth whatsoever. But I’ll do this for you: I’ll say that if you want to hope that they somehow manage to get some growth, then you can buy it. But if I want no growth, I want safety and I want a bond.”

Chico’s FAS Inc.: “No. Don’t ask me about Chico’s. That was a horrible quarter, frankly. I mean, that may have been the worst of the mall-based stores. No, well, obviously there’s Sears and J.C. Penney, but it was a bad call. I don’t want you in that, OK?”

LyondellBasell Industries NV: “People feel that we’re going into a big slowdown and you don’t want to own a chemical company into a slowdown, but I agree with you. I think it represents good value with a 4 percent yield, but I do prefer DowDuPont.”

[“source=forbes]

Microsoft has better fundamentals, but buy Apple, says tech investor

Microsoft has better fundamentals, but buy Apple, says Heartland Financial CIO

Microsoft has better fundamentals, but buy Apple, says Heartland Financial CIO   11 Hours Ago | 02:58

Microsoft may have replaced Apple as the most valuable U.S. company, but don’t count Apple out, investor Nancy Tengler told CNBC on Friday.

“Clearly the fundamentals are better for Microsoft in terms of which space they’re in — the cloud space, the growth they’re experiencing — but I’m not willing to walk away from Apple at these levels,” the chief investment officer at Heartland Financial said on “Closing Bell.”

Microsoft’s market cap held an implied market valuation of $851.2 billion at Friday’s close, exceeding Apple’s market valuation of $847.4 billion.

Tim Cook, chief executive office of Apple Inc., speaks during an event at Lane Technical College Prep High School in Chicago, Illinois, U.S., on Tuesday, March 27, 2018. Apple is making announcements in a bid to win back students and teachers from Google and Microsoft Corp. 

Christopher Dilts | Bloomberg | Getty Images
Tim Cook, chief executive office of Apple Inc., speaks during an event at Lane Technical College Prep High School in Chicago, Illinois, U.S., on Tuesday, March 27, 2018. Apple is making announcements in a bid to win back students and teachers from Google and Microsoft Corp.

Tengler, who owns shares of both Apple and Microsoft, said she’s closer to selling Microsoft and buying Apple right now. “This is an interesting time to be adding.”

“We have to get used to the recalibration of iPhone flat sales, no transparency, what’s the next big thing,” she said. “We’re going to find it’s services and something we haven’t thought of yet. Look at the Apple Watch, it’s just kind of been a stealth outperformer.”

Apple shares have had a few rough weeks, releasing disappointing earnings on Nov. 1. The tech giant also announced it would no longer break out iPhone, iPad and Mac sales figures, which garnered a swift response from Wall Street.

However, Tengler dismissed analysts’ concerns.

“Wall Street gets embarrassed. They’re like a woman scorned. When they don’t get the information they want, then they begin to pile on,” she said.

She is betting that Apple will make the successful transition to the next big thing and will bring the Street along. It just may take some time, she added.

[“source=cnbc”]

China says exports to US rising ‘because American economy is strong and they want to buy our products’

China’s exports to the United States are still growing, thanks to a strong American economy and consumers’ preference for Chinese products, China’s ministry of commerce said on Monday.

The delivery of previously placed orders and “front-loading” by Chinese shippers also contributed to a robust performance so far this year, the ministry concluded in a report reviewing and forecasting China’s trade performance.

As such, the impact of the US trade war on China’s trade and broad economy will be “limited” with “total risks under control”, the ministry concluded in the report.

“The United States unilaterally provoked economic and trade friction, which not only affects Sino-US trade but has also brought significant uncertainties to the development of global trade and investment,” the ministry said.

China’s exports to the US rose 13.3 per cent in the first 10 months compared with a year earlier while its imports from the US increased by 8.5 per cent in the same period, according to China customs data. In October alone, Chinese exports to the US rose by 13.2 per cent while its imports from the US fell 1.8 per cent, earning Beijing a trade surplus of US$32 billion last month.

According to Beijing’s commerce ministry, strong demand for imported products in the US – the result of low unemployment, robust growth and good consumer confidence – is a fundamental factor helping China to sell to the US despite tariffs imposed by US President Donald Trump.

In addition, the industrial chains of China and the US are “closely integrated” and the two countries’ economic structures are “highly complementary”, the ministry added.

The US imposed 10 per cent tariffs on US$200 billion worth of Chinese products in late September – a rate set to rise to 25 per cent in January if Beijing does not make concessions.

The measures followed an initial round of tariffs on US$50 billion worth of products.

China has responded in a tit-for-tat manner by imposing tariffs on US imports.

While China’s export data looks solid for now, many economists said the impact of the trade war would start showing up in the first or second quarter of next year, adding to the woes of an economy that is already growing at its slowest pace in a decade.

China’s trade ministry also said that the country “faces both severe challenges and presents new development potential” next year and that the ministry would work hard to ensure a “steady” trade situation.

President Xi Jinping is set to meet Trump at the G20 leaders summit in Argentina next month in the hope of easing trade tensions.

Speaking at China’s first imports expo in Shanghai last week, Xi said China would buy more goods and services from abroad, saying the country’s purchases of foreign goods would be worth US$30 trillion over the next 15 years.

Xi also announced the country would buy US$10 trillion worth of foreign services in the same period.

Analysts expect the trade war will see China importing more from other countries as it reduces tariffs. However, China’s growth is likely to slow further in the coming months as the trade war takes its toll.

In response – amid signals that policymakers are increasingly nervous about the outlook –, the government has launched a series of measures to support the economy, including cutting individual taxes, speeding up infrastructure spending and extending additional financing options to help struggling smaller companies.

China’s exports to the United States are still growing, thanks to a strong American economy and consumers’ preference for Chinese products, China’s ministry of commerce said on Monday.

The delivery of previously placed orders and “front-loading” by Chinese shippers also contributed to a robust performance so far this year, the ministry concluded in a report reviewing and forecasting China’s trade performance.

As such, the impact of the US trade war on China’s trade and broad economy will be “limited” with “total risks under control”, the ministry concluded in the report.

“The United States unilaterally provoked economic and trade friction, which not only affects Sino-US trade but has also brought significant uncertainties to the development of global trade and investment,” the ministry said.

China’s exports to the US rose 13.3 per cent in the first 10 months compared with a year earlier while its imports from the US increased by 8.5 per cent in the same period, according to China customs data. In October alone, Chinese exports to the US rose by 13.2 per cent while its imports from the US fell 1.8 per cent, earning Beijing a trade surplus of US$32 billion last month.

According to Beijing’s commerce ministry, strong demand for imported products in the US – the result of low unemployment, robust growth and good consumer confidence – is a fundamental factor helping China to sell to the US despite tariffs imposed by US President Donald Trump.

In addition, the industrial chains of China and the US are “closely integrated” and the two countries’ economic structures are “highly complementary”, the ministry added.

The US imposed 10 per cent tariffs on US$200 billion worth of Chinese products in late September – a rate set to rise to 25 per cent in January if Beijing does not make concessions.

The measures followed an initial round of tariffs on US$50 billion worth of products.

China has responded in a tit-for-tat manner by imposing tariffs on US imports.

While China’s export data looks solid for now, many economists said the impact of the trade war would start showing up in the first or second quarter of next year, adding to the woes of an economy that is already growing at its slowest pace in a decade.

China’s trade ministry also said that the country “faces both severe challenges and presents new development potential” next year and that the ministry would work hard to ensure a “steady” trade situation.

President Xi Jinping is set to meet Trump at the G20 leaders summit in Argentina next month in the hope of easing trade tensions.

Speaking at China’s first imports expo in Shanghai last week, Xi said China would buy more goods and services from abroad, saying the country’s purchases of foreign goods would be worth US$30 trillion over the next 15 years.

Xi also announced the country would buy US$10 trillion worth of foreign services in the same period.

Analysts expect the trade war will see China importing more from other countries as it reduces tariffs. However, China’s growth is likely to slow further in the coming months as the trade war takes its toll.

In response – amid signals that policymakers are increasingly nervous about the outlook –, the government has launched a series of measures to support the economy, including cutting individual taxes, speeding up infrastructure spending and extending additional financing options to help struggling smaller companies.

[“source=cnbc”]